From Pooka’s Crayon turned 1 today!

From Pooka’s Crayon turned 1 today!

tiffcheongsy:


In this May 17, 1980 photo, 30-year old vulcanologist David Johnston is shown in the evening at his camp near what is now known as Johnston Ridge near Mount St. Helens. At 8:32 a.m. the next morning, Johnston radioed a message to the USGS headquarters: “Vancouver, Vancouver, this is it!”, shortly before he was killed by the massive eruption of the volcano that also killed 56 others. (AP Photo/USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, Harry Glicken)

Click to see more INCREDIBLE pictures. It is so sad. I think studying the impacts in school has desensitized many. We need to really understand why the memories this eruption still haunt people 30 years after.

tiffcheongsy:

In this May 17, 1980 photo, 30-year old vulcanologist David Johnston is shown in the evening at his camp near what is now known as Johnston Ridge near Mount St. Helens. At 8:32 a.m. the next morning, Johnston radioed a message to the USGS headquarters: “Vancouver, Vancouver, this is it!”, shortly before he was killed by the massive eruption of the volcano that also killed 56 others. (AP Photo/USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, Harry Glicken)

Click to see more INCREDIBLE pictures. It is so sad. I think studying the impacts in school has desensitized many. We need to really understand why the memories this eruption still haunt people 30 years after.

edwardianera:

“The Burning of the Call.” The San Francisco Call newspaper building in flames after the April 18, 1906 earthquake.

edwardianera:

“The Burning of the Call.” The San Francisco Call newspaper building in flames after the April 18, 1906 earthquake.

raspberricupcakes:

Cheesecake Filled Chocolate Easter Eggs with Passionfruit Sauce
http://www.raspberricupcakes.com/2012/04/cheesecake-filled-chocolate-easter-eggs.html
rhamphotheca:

Prehistoric Wolf Ice-Skated to Remote Island
by Charles Choi
The mystery surrounding the origin of a wolflike predator that once lived near Antarctica — a puzzle that stumped even Charles Darwin — has now been solved, researchers say.
The extinct carnivore apparently made its way to islands hundreds of miles from the nearest continent by crossing the frozen sea thousands of years ago, scientists explained.
The reddish coyote-sized Falkland Islands wolf was the only mammal native to the Falkland Islands far off the east coast of Argentina. The foxlike predator lived on seals, penguins and sea birds until hunters exterminated it in 1876.
The existence of the Falklands wolf perplexed Darwin when he first encountered it in 1834. “How did this great big carnivore arrive to a set of islands 460 kilometers (285 miles) from the nearest mainland when no other terrestrial mammal did?” asked researcher Alan Cooper, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Adelaide in Australia. “If it came by a land bridge, then the islands should’ve been covered with rodents as well, since South America is rodent central.”…
(read more: Live Science)               
(image: Michael Rothman/Ace Coinage)

rhamphotheca:

Prehistoric Wolf Ice-Skated to Remote Island

by Charles Choi

The mystery surrounding the origin of a wolflike predator that once lived near Antarctica — a puzzle that stumped even Charles Darwin — has now been solved, researchers say.

The extinct carnivore apparently made its way to islands hundreds of miles from the nearest continent by crossing the frozen sea thousands of years ago, scientists explained.

The reddish coyote-sized Falkland Islands wolf was the only mammal native to the Falkland Islands far off the east coast of Argentina. The foxlike predator lived on seals, penguins and sea birds until hunters exterminated it in 1876.

The existence of the Falklands wolf perplexed Darwin when he first encountered it in 1834. “How did this great big carnivore arrive to a set of islands 460 kilometers (285 miles) from the nearest mainland when no other terrestrial mammal did?” asked researcher Alan Cooper, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Adelaide in Australia. “If it came by a land bridge, then the islands should’ve been covered with rodents as well, since South America is rodent central.”…

(read more: Live Science)               

(image: Michael Rothman/Ace Coinage)

archaeologicalnews:

image

The discovery and analysis of an extremely rare African American Y chromosome pushes back the time of the most recent common ancestor for the Y chromosome lineage tree to 338,000 years ago. This time predates the age of the oldest known anatomically modern human fossils.

University of…

beersandbeckelines:

Overenthused undergrad for scale.

beersandbeckelines:

Overenthused undergrad for scale.

joncarling:

My pal Ryan Mcjunkin silkscreened my new drawing onto wood panels for an upcoming printmaking show in Oakland March 16th.  Cool! 

joncarling:

My pal Ryan Mcjunkin silkscreened my new drawing onto wood panels for an upcoming printmaking show in Oakland March 16th.  Cool! 


From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; March 4, 2013:
Yasuní National Park, Ecuador Steve Winter, National Geographic
From the bromeliads, ferns, and orchids that cover a Kapok Tree (Ceiba pentandra) 160 feet above the forest floor to the jaguars that prowl below, Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park is home to countless plant and animal species. All of them now face threats from oil development.
See more pictures from the January 2013 feature story ”Rain Forest for Sale.”

From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; March 4, 2013:

Yasuní National Park, Ecuador Steve Winter, National Geographic

From the bromeliads, ferns, and orchids that cover a Kapok Tree (Ceiba pentandra) 160 feet above the forest floor to the jaguars that prowl below, Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park is home to countless plant and animal species. All of them now face threats from oil development.

See more pictures from the January 2013 feature story ”Rain Forest for Sale.”

rhamphotheca:

BOOK REVIEW:

Hunter and Barrett’s A Field Guide to the Carnivores of the World

by Darren Naish, Scientific American

For all their popularity as the subject of dedicated books, cats, dogs, bears and their relatives have never previously been the focus of a single, field guide-style volume that treats all of them together. Luke Hunter and Priscilla Barrett’s A Field Guide to the Carnivores of the World (published 2011) is a beautifully illustrated, comprehensive book that treats all 245 or so living carnivoran species in turn. The book is compact (16 x 24 cm) and designed with text on the left-side pages and illustrations on the right-side pages.

Regarding the book’s title, I really wish that people would universally switch to the term carnivoran when referring to members of the group Carnivora. Calling these animals ‘carnivores’ is a frequent source of confusion and ambiguity. Having said this, I fully realise that a great many biologists have no plans to change things, so that needless ambiguity is destined to remain for now.

An introductory section depicts an up-to-date carnivoran phylogeny before summarising the history, biology and distribution of the 13 ‘family’-level groups covered here. The up-to-date-ness is demonstrated by the inclusion of separate sections for Mephitidae, Nandiniidae, Prionodontidae and Eupleridae…

(read more: Scientific American)    

collectivehistory:

Example of a Japanese fighting monk of the Kamakura epoch (1185–1333 AD), c. 1900. (Source)

collectivehistory:

Example of a Japanese fighting monk of the Kamakura epoch (1185–1333 AD), c. 1900. (Source)

insectlove:

fyeahmantodea: Female Sibylla pretiosa cleaning.

insectlove:

fyeahmantodeaFemale Sibylla pretiosa cleaning.

explore-blog:

Buckminster Fuller
elsian:

My September entry for Neil Gaiman’s A Calendar of Tales. Reposting because I fixed some things

elsian:

My September entry for Neil Gaiman’s A Calendar of Tales. Reposting because I fixed some things